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Making Assessment Work for You! Your Course, Your Program, and SDSU



Full Schedule | Session Descriptions

Keynote

Rm. AH2108
8:30
Learner Analytics and the “Big Data” Promise for Course & Program Assessment, John Whitmer, California State University, Chico, Hillary Kaplowitz, California State University, Northridge and Thomas J. Norman, CSU Dominguez Hills

Universities archive massive amounts of data about students and their activities. Students also generate significant amounts of “digital exhaust” as they use academic technologies. How can faculty and administrators use automated analysis of this data to save time and conduct targeted interventions to improve student learning?

The emerging discipline of Learner Analytics conducts analysis of this data to learn about student behaviors, predict students at-risk of failure, and identify potential interventions to help those students. In this presentation, we will discuss the contours of this discipline and review the state of research conducted to date. We will then look at several examples of Learner Analytics services and hear from California State University educators who are using these tools to help their students. Finally, we will suggest some immediate ways that Analytics can be conducted at San Diego State. Watch Presentation
Rm. AH2108
Time

Digital Age Assessment: Tools to Use

9:40
Bookending Course Data: Using Front- and Back-end Data to Improve Learning Outcomes Part 1: Front-end Decision Making Jim Marshall, Educational Technology
Front-end Decision Making: We will begin by examining how students select courses. From online course syllabi to RateMyProfessors.com, students can access increasing amounts of data. What criteria do they use to make course decisions? What information could enable effective choices? Watch Presentation
10:20
Bookending Course Data: Using Front- and Back-end Data to Improve Learning Outcomes, Part 2: Back-end Evaluation for Course Enhancement Marcie Bober-Michel, Educational Technology
Back-end Evaluation for Course Enhancement: During the section half, we explore both formative (mid-term) and summative (end-of-term) ways to assess student perceptions of the courses in which they're enrolled. How engaged are they in the course content? In what ways are their courses interactive--and how do those strategies promote knowledge and skill gain?s Do students see their courses as relevant to their professional goals? How challenged do they feel--and thus motivated to do well? Watch Presentation
11:00
QOLT: Efforts to Identify and Improve Online Teaching and Learning Brett Christie, CSU Sonoma State & Faculty Development Liaison, CSU Academic Technology Services
In 2011, the CSU developed and implemented a pilot Quality Online Learning and Teaching program. QOLT includes a thorough evaluation instrument, which serves as course assessment, as well as a guide for course (re)design and development efforts. In addition, QOLT has been a way to bring together faculty and respective faculty support units (e.g., faculty development, academic technology). Participants will be encouraged to ask questions regarding the origins, uses, and future direction of QOLT. In addition, all QOLT materials will be made available for ongoing access. 60 minute session Watch Presentation
1:40
Exams and Test-taking in the Digital Age Stephen Schellenberg, Geological Sciences
Academic misconduct during “high-stakes” online examinations is a justified concern and potential limitation for the development, expansion, and reputation of distance-education courses. In this presentation, I will explore some causes of misconduct (e.g., implicit nature of “high-stakes” assessment, failure of relevance, etc.) and some solutions through course redesign. In addition, I will overview some pragmatic mitigation strategies ranging from readily implemented Blackboard-based options to the establishment of a centralized on-campus assessment-center. Watch Presentation
2:20
Why Curve-Based Grading Muddies Assessment of Actual Achievement and How Faculty Can Move Towards Clarity Brock Allen, Center for Teaching and Learning
"The normal curve is a distribution most appropriate to chance and random activity. Education is a purposeful activity and we seek to have students learn what we would teach. Therefore, if we are effective, the distribution of grades will be anything but a normal curve. In fact, a normal curve is evidence of our failure to teach."--Benjamin Bloom
Watch Presentation
3:00
Security and Privacy in the Digital Age Rich Pickett, Senior Director and Chief Information Officer, ETS
Rich will discuss security and privacy as it relates to digital technologies and online teaching and learning. Watch Presentation
Rm. AH1120
Time

Faculty Showcase

9:40
Psychedelic assessment: Group Blogs and Wikis on Blackboard Eric Smigel, Musicology
Class discussion has always been an excellent way for students to exchange ideas and for instructors to gauge the students’ familiarity with the subject, but encouraging interactive activities in a large general-education course can be challenging, and grading hundreds of response papers several times a semester is time consuming. Multimedia blogs and wikis can be an effective online alternative to in-class discussions, and the evaluation of group projects is greatly facilitated by the new rubrics tool in Blackboard. In this session, I will describe my experiences designing, assigning, and assessing blog and wiki projects for the Spring 2012 section of Music 351: Psychedelic Rock of the 1960s. Watch Presentation
10:20
Peer Review With Turnitin’s PeerMark: The Rewards & Challenges Katie Hughes, Rhetoric and Writing Studies
I will explain how the online peer review experience through Turnitin’s PeerMark has generated more valuable and efficient work for my students, while freeing up class time and lessening paper work for me. I will also address some of the challenges involved in making this system work as seamlessly as possible. PowerPoint Slides
11:00
Using a "Workplace Model" to Assess Students Terri Larsen, Computer Science & Data Visualization Consultant
Learn why some students excel in school yet flounder in the workplace and discover how to align academics with real-world achievement. Learn tips for motivating struggling students and how to shift a student’s thinking from grades to achievement. I will provide the templates and describe the strategies I used to assess students.
Sample timesheets: TimeSheet1Form.xlsx TimeSheet2Form.xlsx TimeSheet2completed.xls Sample performance evaluation form: Student Performance Self Evaluation Forma.docx Deck: TLarsenCDI2012.pptx (as pdf) TLarsenCDI2012.pdf Watch Presentation
11:40
Adaptive Quizzing: Using Quizzes to Help Your Students Learn Mark Laumakis, Psychology
This session will examine the emergence of adaptive quizzing as a formative assessment course design tool that can help students learn via specially designed quizzes. I will demonstrate the use of Worth Publishers’ LearningCurve, which uses a game-like interface to guide students through a series of questions catered to their individual level of understanding of course material. Data from the Spring 2012 semester pilot of LearningCurve activities in my Introductory Psychology course will be presented. Watch Presentation
1:40
Integrating Google Docs for Assessment Janet Bowers, Mathematics and Statistics
Speaker will discuss how class activities were enhanced by integrating a variety of Google docs applications. Examples include Google sites, documents, spreadsheets, and forms, all of which can be formatted for iPad. Watch Presentation
2:20
Quit Fighting with Assessment and Make It Work for You Val Renegar, Communication
With increasing assessment demands it is easy to find yourself trying to impose new guidelines on old course structures, assignments, and thinking, often with painful and ill-fitting result. This talk will focus on going back to the roots of why we teach and what we hope to accomplish in our classes so that more seamless assessment is possible. New assessment demands provide unique opportunities to examine our courses and assignments with fresh eyes and adapt our work to changing technology, new course modalities, shifting student populations, and assessment procedures. Watch Presentation
3:00
CANCELLED A Strategy for Assessing Writing in an Online Course Bill Eadie, Journalism and Media Studies
Grading student writing in large enrollment classes can be overwhelming. This workshop will present a means for evaluating student essays in online classes while simultaneously striving to improve critical thinking.
Rm. AH1112
Time

Programmatic Assessment

9:40
Setting the Stage for Program Assessment: A Case Study of the School of Communication (Part I) and Putting on the Play: A Case Study of the School of Communication (Part II) Brian Spitzberg, Communication
This presentation will examine program assessment from the perspective of an assessment scholar and basic research scientist, with an eye toward some of the ways in which theatrics and science intersect in the realm of assessment. Specifically, the School of Communication is examined as an assessment work-in-progress, in which: (a) a foundational approach to assessment was derived from both (i) existing disciplinary literature and (ii) more inductive means of surveying faculty and curricular contents; and (b) a multi-pronged approach to formulating an assessment plan was developed. This approach takes a representational validity perspective, in which the existing curriculum is employed to build the program learning objectives, which are then translated into assessment techniques, thereby tethering learning objectives to assessment practices. 60 minute session PowerPoint Slides School of Commication Assessment Report Watch Presentation
11:00
Lessons Learned Part I. Assurance of Learning: Strategic planning through programmatic assessment Kathy Krentler, Marketing
This presentation and discussion will explore activities of the College of Business Administration as a model of thoughtful curriculum planning via programmatic assessment. The CBA is committed to student learning, has worked diligently to develop a culture of assessment, and is focused on programmatic improvement directed by assessment results. Student learning outcomes and assessment plans have been developed and implemented for each undergraduate major in the college and each graduate program including the Executive MBA. The success of the college's efforts to accomplish their learning outcomes is measured through a wide variety of direct measures including student portfolios, questions embedded in exams, assignments and case analyses. Additionally indirect measures such as surveys are routinely used to triangulate the results of the direct assessment measures. Assessment results are shared throughout the college and serve as the driving force for programmatic change. The college has reported its assessment efforts via a website for the past several years but has now embraced WEAVE Online as its primary reporting tool. PowerPoint Slides Watch Presentation
11:40
Lessons Learned Part II. Achieving Faculty Buy-In and Spreading the Word: Adapting to thrive in changing times Kathy Krentler, Marketing
This presentation addresses two challenges faced by many as departments and colleges work to develop assessment systems and nurture them to maturity. Challenge One: Establishing a culture of assessment among faculty. Many faculty members are generally not familiar with evidence-based assurance of learning. Initially resistant, some see assessment as nothing more than the latest call for accountability and just another report that needs to be generated. Challenge Two: Establishing a culture of assessment among students. Students often see school as a series of "courses to be conquered" rather than a coherent program. Clearly, an understanding of programmatic learning outcomes requires the introduction of assessment to students and faculty both. This session will explore ways that we can address these challenges.
1:40
Programmatic Assessment Working Session: Planning Curricula using WEAVEonline Kathy S. Williams, Susan Levy, and other members of the Student Learning Outcomes Committee
This afternoon session focuses helping faculty teams take advantage of the opportunities offered by SDSU's recently adopted WEAVEonline system for collecting, examining, designing, reporting, and sharing information about our students' academic achievements. Since Sept, most SDSU departments have recorded and been modifying goals and expected learning outcomes of their academic programs using WEAVEonline. Some are actively leveraging WEAVE to address complex curriculum planning challenges, program reviews, and accreditation. Many programs are already using WEAVE to describe how learning outcomes are being measured and to record findings from those assessments. To plan curricula and identify resource needs, programs are using WEAVE to document findings and map program-level learning outcomes to department, college, university, and even accreditation agency goals.
By June 15, it's expected that all programs will have entered a description for how they plan to measure learning outcomes and will be preparing to collect the data and enter findings. This afternoon workshop will provide personal coaching on how to enter data and use WEAVEonline to help with your planning. We hope that programs will send teams of faculty who are involved with programmatic assessment and curriculum planning to this event.90 minute session SDSU WEAVE Quick_start_guide2012.pdf
Fit Center
Time

ITS Tools Kiosk

9:40
Blackboard Analytics John Whiter, Associate Director, Learning Management Systems and Services, CSU Academic Technology Services
10:20
Library Tutorials Pam Jackson, Information Literacy Librarian
11:00
Turrnitin (Originaltiy Check, GradeMark and PeerMark) and Respondus Andrea Saltzman, Faculty Consultant, College of Education and ITS &
Carol Tohsaku, Faculty Consultant, ITS
11:40
Turrnitin (Originaltiy Check, GradeMark and PeerMark) and Respondus Andrea Saltzman, Faculty Consultant, College of Education and ITS &
Carol Tohsaku, Faculty Consultant, ITS
1:40
Blackboard Assessment Tools Linda Woods, Faculty Consultant, ITS
2:20
Blackboard Assessment and Universal Design for Learning Jon Rizzo, Faculty Consultant, ITS

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